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Managing Depression in College

The transition to college and the demands related to being a more independent young adult often manifest in students feeling isolated, stressed out, and depressed. How can college students be more resilient to their circumstances so they can focus on their schooling and future success?

Depression in college students can impact their school performance, personal relationships and overall satisfaction with life. This can lead to social isolation, academic failure and even dropout. Here are some ways college students can help prevent their mental health symptoms from getting worse:

  1. Prioritizing Sleep - College students are notoriously run down due to lack of sleep related to studying, socializing, or stress creating insomnia and preventing restful sleep. Not getting enough sleep is like waking up with an empty gas tank, you can’t expect to get far on low fuel to help you accomplish what you need to. It’s helpful to identify a healthy sleep routine in order to be successful in getting enough rest.
  2. Getting Adequate Nutrition - Similar to sleep, if our body does not have the fuel it needs to perform well, our systems will suffer. Eating healthy can be tough on a budget, in a dorm, or without cooking skills, but an essential component to staying mentally and physically well. Being aware of, and incorporating foods our body needs can make a big difference.

  3. Having Fun - College can be a time of high stress due to academic demands, balancing school and work with a personal life, and the general growing pains of becoming an independent adult. It is important to make time for things that bring joy, such as hobbies and time with loved ones. Fun can help us decompress from stress and gives us something to look forward to.

For students who are already struggling, or the suggestions listed above are just not enough support, here are some suggestions on how to get back on track with good mental health:

  1. Peer or Family Support - Talking to someone you can trust and feel supported by either once or ongoingly can go a long way when you are feeling down. Our personal contacts can help us feel heard, understood, and supported and are sometimes just what we need to feel more ourselves.

  2. Meeting With a Mental Health Professional - Whether you are looking for a professional to talk to for therapy, or a mental health assessment and medication, reaching out for professional support is a great way to get an outside perspective and the services you need to feel mentally healthy again.

  3. Receiving TMS Treatment - For more persistent depression symptoms that aren’t responding well to interventions previously mentioned, TMS Therapy is non-invasive and effective in helping clients find relief from depression symptoms.

Recognizing the need for support in ourselves and others is important. If you or someone you know would like a free consultation or to book any of the services mentioned in this post, please call us at 763-559-1640 and one of our team members would be happy to assist you.

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